BlackBerry Passport Review - Giving Your Best Enough

Written By Chio Chyo on Tuesday, October 21, 2014 | 5:08 AM

Recently, BlackBerry and Nokia were the just brands that mattered when it found mobile phones. Now both are fighting to remain relevant in the increasingly brutal smart phone game. BlackBerry’s previous attempt saw them attempt to fight head on with Apple and Samsung to land devices within the hand of the general consumer.
The Canadian company’s latest work, the Passport is taking the company to its roots and focusing squarely from business users, or who BlackBerry phone calls Power Pros. Returning to the phone is really a physical keyboard, but this one takes it to another level. The keys themselves are touching sensitive and you will swipe over them to scroll down a webpage or use them to move a cursor when you wish to edit a word. It also enables you to flick up on the keys to pick words that are predicted for a person up above. It works well and it is a genuinely useful way to provide the keys another use.

There’s a reason the telephone itself is called the Passport, and that's of course, because it was made to be the same dimensions as a global passport. That design is the products biggest talking point, particularly the sq. display. It’s also both the Passport’s greatest strength and biggest weakness.

Firstly, the screen is incredibly sharp with textual content and images displaying much clearer compared to any BlackBerry before it. The width from the screen makes it exceptional for browsing the net and reading emails, with more text in a position to fit on each line meaning you don’t need to scroll as often.

But, despite all of that, the width of the screen makes these devices uncomfortable to hold with one hand and due to the square shaped screen; videos always have black bars on top and bottom. The Passport’s camera is really a big improvement on previous BlackBerry digital cameras. But that isn’t saying much. The 13MP is okay for basic social sharing, but it certainly isn’t right with Apple, Samsung or Sony’s flagship digital cameras.

Battery life on the other hands is phenomenal, easily lasting a day time of very heavy usage between 6:30 each morning to when I go to sleep at 10 o’clock through the night, often with about 30% remaining. BlackBerry pre-loading Amazon’s Android App Store that has around 240,000 apps to choose from along with the apps in the BlackBerry Globe. It’s still lacking a few key such things as Google’s suite of apps, but typically you are covered.

Using the device involves plenty of swiping to get between screens. Once you get accustomed to it though, you realize it is a genuinely intuitive way to utilize a phone and makes navigating around simple and fluid. The BlackBerry Hub puts all of your emails, texts, BBM and social networks to the one area, making it easy to be along with all the avenues you communicate. An element I wish Android or iOS might have.

That fluidity and ease is what BlackBerry says the device is about, but despite it working a lot of times, the device can’t help but getting when it comes to itself. Little things like notifications that don’t automatically become read should you read them on another device and difficult to find individual app settings are just two stuff that let it down. They’re not large things, but lots of little things accumulate.

Ultimately that is how you describe this product. It tries so hard to end up being great, and often it is, but just when you begin to think how brilliant it is actually, it gets in the way of itself and that's immensely frustrating, if only because from the potential it could have.

Should you choose a lot of work on your own phone with two hands and don’t consume or create an excessive amount of media on it, then the Passport is really a solid option. But for everyone otherwise, there are better things out presently there. Pricing and availability has not however been announced but BlackBerry has said they are hoping to achieve the Passport on Aussie shelves by the finish of October.
Blog, Updated at: 5:08 AM

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